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Long Museum, West Bund

Pictured:

Rembrandt van Rijn and Workshop, Portrait of Antonie Coopal,

Image Alt Text:Long Museum Venue Header Image
1635, oil on Brazilian Chestnut (sucupira), 83.5 x 67.6 cm, The Leiden Collection, New York.

Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hals in the Dutch Golden Age: Masterpieces from The Leiden Collection

 

Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hals in the Dutch Golden Age: Masterpieces from The Leiden Collection presents a window into the evocative moment of artistic creativity that took place in the seventeenth-century Dutch Republic. Following the development of Dutch art through a selection of 78 history paintings, genre scenes, portraits, and drawings, the exhibition provides a comprehensive understanding of the history of Dutch art during its Golden Age through The Leiden Collection.

The ways in which artists responded to one another, and to tradition, are central to the themes and scope of the exhibition. These relationships are explored most centrally through the remarkable breadth and depth of artistic innovation in Leiden, as demonstrated by Rembrandt van Rijn and Jan Lievens, and the Leiden fine painters, Gerrit Dou and Frans van Mieris. The exhibition further explores the work of important Dutch and Flemish artists in other artistic centers, including Frans Hals, Hendrick ter Brugghen, Jan Steen, Carel Fabritius, Peter Paul Rubens, and Johannes Vermeer.

Dates
September 23, 2017February 25, 2018
Location
3398 Longteng Ave,
Xuhui Qui, Shanghai Shi, China
Tel.: 021 68778787
Opening Hours
10:00am-6:00pm
Tuesday-Sunday
Monday closed
Last admission at 5:00pm
More Information

Rembrandt and His Time: Masterpieces from The Leiden Collection

Learn about the exhibition through this video featuring Dr. Thomas S. Kaplan and Dr. Lara Yeager-Crasselt, joined by Dr. Arthur K. Wheelock, Jr., Curator of Northern Baroque Paintings, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and Dr. Ronni Baer, Senior Curator of European Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. This video was created by Video Art Productions.

A fully illustrated exhibition catalogue accompanies Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hals in the Dutch Golden Age: Masterpieces from The Leiden Collection.

The catalogue contains a Foreword by Dr. Thomas S. Kaplan, founder of The Leiden Collection, a Preface by Ms. Wang Wei, founder of the Long Museum,  and two essays by Curator Dr. Lara Yeager-Crasselt focusing on The Leiden Collection in the Dutch Golden Age, as well as China and the Dutch Republic in the seventeenth century. The catalogue also includes 78 color illustrations.

Extraordinary Beginnings: Rembrandt van Rijn in Leiden

The works by Rembrandt van Rijn and Jan Lievens in The Leiden Collection provide a window into both artists’ formative years. This foundation stimulated an artistic dialogue between these two artists, as well as the larger circle that emerged around them. Of similar importance for Rembrandt’s artistic growth was the model provided by the Flemish artist, humanist, and diplomat Peter Paul Rubens.

Portrait of Rembrandt in Oriental Dress
Isaac de Jouderville Portrait of Rembrandt in Oriental Dress See Larger Image

The Earliest Paintings: Allegory of the Senses

Rembrandt van Rijn, Three Musicians (Allegory of Hearing)
Rembrandt van Rijn Three Musicians (Allegory of Hearing) See Larger Image
Rembrandt van Rijn Unconscious Patient (Allegory of Smell) See Larger Image
Rembrandt van Rijn Stone Operation (Allegory of Touch) See Larger Image

Rembrandt’s Teacher

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Pieter Lastman David Gives Uriah a Letter for Joab See Larger Image

The Flemish Model: Peter Paul Rubens and the Antique Tradition

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Peter Paul Rubens Julius Caesar See Larger Image
Peter Paul Rubens Emperor Commodus as Hercules and as a Gladiator See Larger Image

Inspiration and Competition

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Hendrick ter Brugghen Allegory of Faith See Larger Image
Jan Lievens Card Players See Larger Image
Jan Lievens Bookkeeper at His Desk See Larger Image
Jan Lievens Self-Portrait See Larger Image
Jan Lievens Boy in a Cape and Turban (Portrait of Prince Rupert of the Palatinate) See Larger Image

The Center of the Golden Age: Rembrandt in Amsterdam

Rembrandt left Leiden for Amsterdam in 1631, where he entered the workshop of art dealer Hendrick van Uylenburgh, and began receiving commissions from Amsterdam’s urban elite. Rembrandt’s portraits, preparatory studies, and history paintings, seen here, illustrate the expressive technique the artist employed to poignantly convey the human experience.

Rembrandt van Rijn Self-Portrait with Shaded Eyes See Larger Image

Portraiture

Rembrandt van Rijn Portrait of a Man in a Red Coat See Larger Image
Rembrandt van Rijn and Workshop Portrait of Antonie Coopal See Larger Image
Rembrandt van Rijn Young Girl in a Gold-Trimmed Cloak See Larger Image

Preparatory Studies

Rembrandt van Rijn Head of a Girl See Larger Image
Rembrandt van Rijn Study of a Woman in a White Cap See Larger Image
Rembrandt van Rijn Portrait of an Old Man (Possibly a Rabbi) See Larger Image

Minerva in Her Study

Rembrandt van Rijn Minerva in Her Study See Larger Image

Rembrandt’s Circle and the Spread of Innovation

Gerbrand van den Eeckhout Simeon in the Temple See Larger Image
Willem de Poorter Solomon and the Queen of Sheba See Larger Image
Govaert Flinck Self-Portrait See Larger Image
Ferdinand Bol Man with a Fur-Trimmed Hat See Larger Image

Divine Lessons

Ferdinand Bol Angel Appearing to Elijah See Larger Image
Carel Fabritius Hagar and the Angel See Larger Image

Studies of the Natural World: Rembrandt and Leonardo da Vinci

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Rembrandt van Rijn Young Lion Resting See Larger Image
Leonardo da Vinci Head of a Bear See Larger Image

Fine Painting in Leiden: Gerrit Dou and Frans van Mieris

Rembrandt’s first pupil in Leiden, Gerrit Dou, did not paint with bold colors in the fluid manner popularized by his master. Instead, he developed a distinctive style known as fijnschilderij, or fine painting. Marked by an extraordinary precision of brushstroke, Dou’s inventive and illustionistic compositions were further explored by the “ prince among his pupils,” Frans van Mieris, whose artwork demanded some of the highest prices of the period.

Attributed to Gerrit Dou Self-Portrait (?) at an Easel See Larger Image

Gerrit Dou: Rembrandt’s First Pupil

Gerrit Dou Goat in a Landscape See Larger Image
Gerrit Dou Herring Seller and Boy See Larger Image
Gerrit Dou Cat Crouching on the Ledge of an Artist’s Atelier See Larger Image

The Scholarly Tradition

Gerrit Dou Scholar Sharpening His Quill See Larger Image
Gerrit Dou Old Man Praying See Larger Image
Gerrit Dou Scholar Interrupted at His Writing See Larger Image

Dou’s Posterity: Frans van Mieris and Godefridus Schalcken

Frans van Mieris Child’s Lesson See Larger Image
Frans van Mieris Death of Lucretia See Larger Image
Gerrit Dou Portrait of a Woman in Profile See Larger Image
Gerrit Dou Portrait of Dirck van Beresteyn See Larger Image
Frans van Mieris Portrait of a Lady See Larger Image
Gerrit Dou Portrait of a Lady, Seated with a Music Book on Her Lap See Larger Image
Frans van Mieris “Self-Portrait” with a Plumed Beret See Larger Image
Frans van Mieris Tronie Self-Portrait of the Artist, Bust-length, Wearing a Turban Crowned with a Feather, and Fur-trimmed Robe See Larger Image
Frans van Mieris Traveler at Rest See Larger Image
Caspar Netscher Sarah Leading Hagar to Abraham See Larger Image
Willem van Mieris Diana, Goddess of the Hunt See Larger Image
Godefridus Schalcken Young Man and Woman Studying a Statue of Venus, by Lamplight See Larger Image
Godefridus Schalcken Parable of the Lost Piece of Silver See Larger Image
Godefridus Schalcken Diana and Her Nymphs in a Clearing See Larger Image
Frans van Mieris Elderly Couple in an Interior See Larger Image
Gabriel Metsu Smoker Seated at a Table See Larger Image

Picturing Everyday Life in the Dutch Republic

Genre painters such as Gabriel Metsu, Gerard ter Borch, and Jan Steen depicted a variety of subjects, from village fairs and music playing, to quiet scenes of family life and leisurely pursuits. Over the course of the century, interest shifted to depictions of the upper class in elegant interiors, as evidenced by Johannes Vermeer’s Young Woman Seated at a Virginal. The evolution of this popular genre was a result of artists’ enduring interest in the world that surrounded them.

Personalities and Professions

Cornelis de Man Portrait of the Pharmacist Dr. Ysbrand Ysbrandsz See Larger Image
Frans Hals Portrait of Conradus Viëtor See Larger Image
Frans Hals Portrait of Samuel Ampzing See Larger Image
Michiel van Musscher Portrait of the Artist in His Studio See Larger Image
Gabriel Metsu Hunter Getting Dressed after Bathing See Larger Image
Pieter van Laer Self-Portrait with Magic Scene See Larger Image

Intimacies and Pleasures of Domestic Life

Gabriel Metsu Young Woman Seated in an Interior, Reading a Letter See Larger Image
Jacob van Loo Young Man Reading See Larger Image
Gerard ter Borch Lady Tickling a Sleeping Soldier See Larger Image
Gerard ter Borch Guardroom Interior with Soldiers Smoking and Playing Cards, See Larger Image
Jacobus Vrel Interior with a Sick Woman by a Fireplace See Larger Image
Jacob Toorenvliet Doctor's Visit See Larger Image
Gerard ter Borch Musical Company See Larger Image
Jan Steen Self-Portrait with a Lute: Sense of Hearing See Larger Image

Humor, Folly, and Delight

Jan Steen Peasants Merrymaking Outside an Inn See Larger Image

From Market to Table

Gabriel Metsu Old Woman at Her Meal in an Interior See Larger Image
Gabriel Metsu Woman Selling Game from a Stall See Larger Image
Jan Steen Prayer Before the Meal See Larger Image

Elegant Interiors

Eglon Hendrik van der Neer Lady Playing a Lute in an Interior See Larger Image
Caspar Netscher Portrait of Susanna Doublet Huygens See Larger Image
Caspar Netscher Two Women in an Interior with a Basket of Lemons See Larger Image

Johannes Vermeer

Johannes Vermeer Young Woman Seated at a Virginal See Larger Image

Historical Lessons and Tales of Morality

Within the context of genre scenes, historical subjects, and portraiture, Dutch artists often imbued their artworks with symbolic, and even moralizing meanings. These cautionary tales provide insight into seventeenth-century Dutch values, and serve as reflections of contemporary social, political, and religious events.

Jan Steen, Sacrifice of Iphigenia

Jan Steen Sacrifice of Iphigenia See Larger Image

Beware of Riches

Jan Steen Lazarus and the Rich Man or 'In Luxury Beware' See Larger Image
Jan Steen Banquet of Anthony and Cleopatra See Larger Image

Staging the Modern Artist: Expressions of a New Beginning

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Attributed to Rembrandt van Rijn Portrait of a Seated Woman with Her Hands Clasped See Larger Image
Arent de Gelder Old Testament Figure, Probably King Solomon See Larger Image